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New Introduction

I haven't written in this blog for nearly two years. Let me re-introduce this blog by answering the 6 WH questions:

Who...

is writing this blog? Me (Jeremy Slagoski). You can see my profile in the margin.

is this blog for? Take a look at the list below, which is prioritized from primary audience to secondary audiences.
  • All ESL and EFL teachers around the world, primarily ones who are teaching or will teaching English in Japan, Korea, Russia, and in American universities
  • EFL and ESL teacher trainers
  • Researchers in the fields of curriculum & instruction, teaching & learning, intercultural communication, and related academic fields
  • Those involved in the English Language Fellowship Program
  • Anyone interested in teaching EFL or ESL
  • English language learners
  • Instructors in general
  • Anyone else who has interest in my profession, my interests, and myself.
What...
is a blog? Click here at http://www.blogger.com/tour_start.g

is this blog about? See below for another list.
  • My observations on teaching English in Japan, Korea, Russia, and Wisconsin
  • My insight into ESL & EFL teaching methods and approaches
  • My reflections on my work as an associate lecturer at the University of Wisconsin at La Crosse and as a Senior English Language Fellow
  • My answers to FAQ (frequently as questions) from Russian teachers of English
Where
I am living in La Crosse, Wisconsin until I choose the best PhD program for myself
I have worked in Kumagaya, in Japan, Seoul in South Korea, the Volga Region in Russia, and La Crosse in the state of Wisconsin.
My hometown is Kenosha, Wisconsin.

When
I started working at the ESL Institute in the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse in September 2007.
My future PhD program will start in either August or September 2009.

Why...
am I teaching English as a foreign language? (summarized answer)
  • I grew up in a multi-cultural family with siblings adopted from Korea and the Philippines.
  • English has been my best and favorite subject since I elementary school.
am in La Crosse, Wisconsin?
  • After teacher-training for five years, I had the desire to go back to teaching English as a Second Language to see if I could practice what I preached.
  • I wanted to live in the United States to start a family and be near more family and friends
  • I wanted to teach ESL full-time in the United States to broaden my abilities and observe the similarities and differences of teaching ESL abroad
How
do I teach English? I teach English using the communicative language teaching approach, more specifically using the task-based and content-based approaches. (summarized answer)

do I speak Japanese, Korean, and Russian? I speak all those languages at the beginning level. My Japanese speaking and listening is probably the best, but I can read and write Korean and Russian much better.

do I go to work? Since my daughter was born, I've been driving to work more often.

is the weather today? It's partly cloudy and pleasant.

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