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Hiatus Ending This Summer

I plan to start actively writing here soon as I have successfully passed my comprehensive exams.  From here on I will publish fragments of my research interests, which concentrate on the population of expatriate or sojourning EFL instructors.  However, I have a strong interest in multiliteracies, so I will probably publish updates on this topic as well.  Thirdly, I may publish about the future of education and higher education in the United States and the world because I believe it will not be the same by the time my daughter graduates from high school.

I expect to post at least once this month, and more regularly through the summer.  Stay tuned!  Thanks for your patience.

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