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Introduction

Let me introduce this blog by answering the 6 WH questions:

Who...

is writing this blog? Me (Jeremy Slagoski). You can see my profile in the margin.
is this blog for? Take a look at the list below, which is prioritized from primary audience to secondary audiences.
  • Russian teachers of English
  • Those involved in the English Language Fellowship Program
  • Non-native speaking EFL teachers around the world
  • All ESL and EFL teachers around the world
  • EFL and ESL teacher trainers
  • Those conducting research in curriculum & instruction, teaching & learning, intercultural communication, and related academic fields.
  • Anyone interested in teaching EFL or ESL
  • English language learners
  • Instructors in general
  • Anyone else who has interest in my profession, my interests, and myself.
What...
is a blog? Click here at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog
is this blog about? See below for another list.
  • My observations on teaching English in Russia
  • My insight into ESL & EFL teaching methods and approaches
  • My reflections on my work as a Senior English Language Fellow
  • My answers to FAQ (frequently as questions) from Russian teachers of English
Where
I am living in Samara, Russia until July 2007.
My work covers the Volga Region of Russia.
My hometown is Kenosha, Wisconsin.
My last American place of residence was Westminster, Maryland.
I have also lived in Japan and Korea.

When
My Fellowship started in September 2006 and ends in July 2007.
I spend about 2 weeks per month in Samara.
I spend the other 2 weeks of each month in other cities of the Volga Region.

Why...
am I teaching English as a foreign language? (summarized answer)
  • I grew up in a multi-cultural family with siblings adopted from Korea and the Philippines.
  • English has been my best and favorite subject since I elementary school.

am in Russia?
  • The English Language Fellow Program selected me out of hundreds of qualified English teaching professionals and then asked if I would like to work in Russia. I agreed.
  • I have always been interested in Eastern Europe because of my Polish heritage.
  • I wanted to educate myself in Russia, which is often misunderstood by the rest of the world.
How
do I teach English? I teach English using the communicative language teaching approach, more specifically using the task-based and content-based approaches. (summarized answer)

do I speak Russian? I speak Russian poorly, but I am taking lessons.

do I go to work? I usually go to work by tram.

is the weather today? There's not a cloud in the sky, but it's very windy and very, very cold.

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